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Photo Sport 200 AW

A backpack designed for athlete-photographers who like to go fast and light.

Will My Gear Fit?


SKU# LP36353-Config

Availability: In stock

$149.99

Quick Overview

A backpack designed for athlete-photographers who like to go fast and light.

Will My Gear Fit?


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Product Details

Trail running and photography. Mountain biking and photography. Snowboarding and photography. Adventure sport athletes who like to go fast and light — but equally like to capture the moment — will enjoy the freedom and comfort of this pack.

  • Ultra-lightweight construction with high-performance fabrics provide comfort, durability and resiliency during extreme activity
  • Ultra-Cinch Camera Chamber protects camera gear in a padded and secure compartment and helps prevent bouncing while athlete/photographer in motion
  • Zippered, side-access pocket allows photographer to quickly rotate to front, unzip, un-cinch and access camera
  • Toploading upper compartment provides up to 13.9 liters of personal space for items like a jacket, lunch, cell phone, etc.
  • Dedicated hydration pocket with port provides storage and easy access to liquid from a hydration reservoir (not included)
  • Multiple attachment points offer a variety ways to expand carrying capacity
  • Sternum strap with built-in safety whistle offers a quick way to sound an alert
  • Patented, built-in All Weather AW Cover™ protects camera and personal gear from the elements
Reviews
Rated 4.3 out of 5 by 25 reviewers.
Rated 3 out of 5 by Good But Not Great I’ve been looking for this pack for years. I’ve used a TopLoad Zoom AW for about 15 years on a chest harness, to carry large 35mm or a German TLR across mountains and deserts, but I’ve wanted to make a change for a long time. Something for a camera body and extra lens, food and clothing and, very importantly, a hydration system. Problem is, few packs have the ability to carry a hydration system, and anyone spending the day in the backcountry will be hard pressed to do it on a couple of water bottles. So, all these years I’ve carried the camera--ever-ready--on my chest, and everything else in a conventional day- or backpack. So, I grabbed this Photo Sport 200 AW up with great gusto. But, I haven’t been able to get behind this pack and the reason is simple: it carries heavy. The old adage--a heavy pack that carries light is more comfortable than a light pack that carries heavy--applies to this pack very well: it weights nothing, but carries heavy, and that’s a terrible shame because it’s so close to being just right. I carried this pack in Yellowstone and Grand Tetons for almost three weeks of hiking, and then carried my water, spare lens and jacket and food in my old daypack, with my TopLoader on my chest with a 28-200 4.0 on my full-size DSLR. Other than sweating front and back--what I was trying to get away from--the old setup was more comfortable. Okay, putting a large DSLR with lens on one side and the rest of the stuff on the other isn’t a fair comparison, but, then again, if that’s what you’re trying to get away from, maybe it is. There’s always trade-offs, and the ultimate judge has to be the factors that define the need: if I’m giving up instant access to my camera, then there has to be a corresponding plus to compensate, such as greater comfort. Let’s start with me: I’m 5’8”, a 34.5” waist and 18” torso and 42” chest. That’s a firm Medium in most packs. I’m a furnace, so comfort is everything and I prefer packs with good ventilation on the back, but I’m not willing to give up carrying comfort for a little air circulation. I got used to the structured back panel; it’s not the best ventilated, but it’s good, and it kept its shape and held the weight as designed. A good frame sheet--or back panel--holds the weight vertically, while keeping sharp things from poking the wearer in the back. This did both very well. Hydration pocket: well designed, placed nearer the back in a separate, zippered pocket, with a hang tab to secure the top of most hydration systems from collapsing into the bottom as you drink it dry. Three small elastic straps on the shoulder straps allow you to guide the drinking tube through to keep in handy and out of the way while hiking. Designed for 70 ounce bladders, I could slide my 100 ounce system in with only a snug fit. The fabric itself is light, seemingly well made ripstop material, and LowePro’s AW system worked perfectly, evidenced by a four-hour hike through varying levels of rainfall that kept the camera inside and dry. The failing, then, is in the shoulder straps and more so the hip belt. The shoulder straps were adequate, even if just barely, but the hip belt needs a little more height or at least more structure to ‘hold’ the weight up (overloaded hip belts collapse rather than keep their shape and nestle the load on the wearer’s hip bones). I would say these components made the pack worth about 10 pounds of carrying capacity, and that’s an easy number to exceed with a day’s worth of stuff. And, I loved the hip belt pockets, which I used for spare batteries, memory cards and lens cloth. Let’s add up my load: water weight about 6 pounds, camera and 16-35mm lens with 28-200 (4.0 L IS) stuffed into the little pocket next to the camera, about 5+ pounds, insulating layer and rain jacket, another two and a half pounds; food a pound, headlamp, battery, gloves about another pound. That’s about 15-16 pounds, and it carried like it was twenty, while a better pack would make it feel like 12. And that’s not good. I carried the above load up mountain trails and had to transfer the weight to my shoulders since the hip belt wasn’t able to keep the load on my hips. I got used to the way it carried, but it wasn’t as good as it should or could be, and I left the tripod in the car rather than further overload the pack. Camera compartment was very tight for my camera and spare lens, and getting it out was almost acrobatic: keep the belt snapped but loosen it, slip right arm out and swing pack around to my front and unzip. The left strap kept falling down--pack straps aren’t made to swing around like slings--which left me crooking my arm to hold the pack up and remove/install my gear. And since my 5D Mk III has the tripod mount and the hand strap, this already bulky camera was barely able to fit inside. Removing the Arca-Swiss mount, and the camera goes in easier. The compartment is too shallow to carry the 28-200 on either of my cameras--the other being a 50D, which fits much better--though as the spare lens it slides into the lens space tightly, which is as it should. I haven’t filled this pack to the top yet, but, then again, having discovered the shoulder straps/hip belt can’t handle the load for a day of shooting in the backcountry, I didn’t so much as take my very light tripod unless it was warm enough to leave corresponding layers in the car. I wore this pack with the above load up to six hours a day. The structured back panel left my merino shirt soaked, which, even with good air flow is just how it’s going to be. However, the measure of a pack isn’t how much stuff it carries, but how it carries the stuff, and this pack has the volume to carry 20+ pounds, but the shoulder and hip structure for about half that amount. I’ve been waiting for this pack for 20 years, and finally LowePro brought it out. Unfortunately, they erred on the side of light rather than on comfortable carrying capacity. Adding a better structured hip belt, perhaps tied into the back panel as part of the structure of the overall pack, would transform this from a good pack for light camera equipment, to a great pack for all your daily shooting--eating, drinking, clothing--needs. September 30, 2013
Rated 5 out of 5 by My bike/photo back bag Pretty awesome backbag. I have done a lot of research before buying one and there is no regret. When you think about getting your gear outdoors, the first concern is about protection, mainly when you go for bike trip. The camera compartment does its job very well. You do not feel like your equipment is in dangerous, so you are free to ride your bike downhill and if the worst happens, just get up, clean the dust and go on. Beside that, I have gone for several day bike trips and I took everything I needed inside it: water, fruits, tools, camera, lens, clothes, glasses, gloves, repairing tools, etc. Of course you will not be able to take supplies for 3 days, but it is not the purpose of this bag. Also it is very comfortable and you will not get tired on the back when you use the waist strap, that also can carry some power bars. I found very easy to grab the camera, shot put it back in the bag and ride back to the trip. The only thing I would complain about is that the camera compartment would be removable, so you could use the bag without it. October 2, 2013
Rated 3 out of 5 by Practical, but lacking in comfort I purchased this camera bag for a trip I did earlier this year to Vietnam and Cambodia in January/February of 2013, and have used it on numerous day trips in New Zealand since. Photography for me is a hobby. I primarily photograph landscapes, so I am constantly heading away on day tramps about twice a month. The Lowepro Photo Sport 200 AW is my primary camera bag for short 2 hour long tramps (hikes if I was in the USA) The camera bag compartment fits my Canon 7D with Canon EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 USM IS lens (attached) quite snuggly (when inserted lens first) with enough room to the side to also accommodate some camera cloths, filter and cable release. (I do not own any other lenses or camera bodies) Inside the bag I can fit my Gitzo traveller tripod (approximately 390mm in length when folded) and numerous other camera accessories and clothing. Personally I carry a small first aid kit, jersey, rain jacket, additional camera cleaning items such as a blower, lens cleaning spray, gloves and if the weather was forecast to turn, then also Rain trousers, which I find the bag accommodates without much issue. If I was intending to use my tripod quite often, then I would place/attach it to the outside of the pack. I find the side pocket quite useful in that respect. I use the zipped top pocket for torch, a few bars and MP3 player. Hydration compartment: I purchased this backpack because of it’s easy access to the camera and because of the hydration compartment, as I intended to use it while cycling in Vietnam and visiting the temples in Cambodia (with 34 – 42 degree heat) While the hydration compartment did accommodate my 2L Camel bak, it did so in a manner that I dis like, by displacing the additional volume onto my back, instead of into the bag. The result was the back pack padding became rounded and quite uncomfortable on my back, until I had drunk about a litre of water, at which point it wasn't as noticeable Comfort: While I use this as my primary camera bag, If I wanted to go on a walk longer than 2 hours where I also wanted 2L of hydration I would choose another bag, as the hydration design, back padding and straps make for an uncomfortable combination Things I like about the pack: I believe it to be well made, with material that feels of good quality. The internal compartment has ample space for my items/clothing, and to date I have not wanted or needed more than is offered. The camera compartment is perfect for my current camera equipment. I like the location and accessibility of the camera compartment. It is quick and easy to get to and open when I find a shot I want. Built in rain cover is good for peace of mind. I’m glad Lowepro thought of adding a hydration compartment (though it could have been designed better) Things I dis like: The shoulder straps are rigged and have little padding, and I find they start cutting into my shoulders on prolonged walks. (A number of companies have come up with what I would best describe as floating/pivoting straps that move with the shoulder, company could AARN has a very comfortable shoulder strap system) I’m 6ft 2 and have a longish back, by the time I have adjusted the straps so the waist straps are comfortable on my hips, I find the shoulder straps have shortened considerable, meaning the chest strap is now very high. Longer straps would be great Back pack padding design, while assisting with air circulation is quite rigged and not very comfortable, I generally start to notice it after about an hour. Hydration compartment would be far more comfortable if the hydration bladder volume was displaced inside the bag instead of onto the wears back. Summary: Great pack for short uses, but I have found overall comfort deteriorates considerable after about 2 hours. I see Lowepro have brought out the Photo Sport Pro 30L AW, with redesigned back padding and hydration compartment. Perhaps these design changes will filter down to the Photo Sport 200 AW and remedy many of my above dis likes. December 28, 2013
Rated 5 out of 5 by Lightweight and practical, excellent quality I bought this backpack two years ago and since then it's been by far my favorite backpack. I am a mountaneer and former climber so I have used lots of different backpacks in the past. After I took on photography I had been looking for a backpack that could properly accomodate my photo equipment. The Photo Sport 200 is just what I was looking for when going on daily trips. It is very lightweight and quite rugged. It's got all the pockets and slings one might need. I use the laptop pocket to carry my filters and the camera inner bag accomodates my D600 with 24-120 + 16-35. The shoulder straps could be just a little thicker as they tend to fold up on the sides. I just wish it was a little bigger (taller) to fit more clothes in the winter, but other than that I am very happy with this product. September 29, 2013
Rated 5 out of 5 by Finally you can end your long search for an outdoor photography bag... I use this product for hiking, camping or pretty much anywhere I go away to. First let me say I spent months trying to find the right bag, even bought some that I sold weeks later for a loss just trying to find the right one. I was looking for an outdoor bag that would hold a water bladder, a decent amount of gear and not be too bulky. Let me say this bag filled all my needs; I really tip my hat off to Lowepro well thought out. It felt like this bag was design for an outdoor photographer, who wanted to make sure they can take their favorite gear out on an adventure. Some main things I like: -The bag's physical size is just right not too small and not to big on my 6 foot frame (this was a problem for me because I found bags to be either too big for hiking or just way undersized). -The bag size tends to match how much you put in it. What I mean is if I pack the bag lightly the bag size is a lot smaller, but when the time comes I can pack her up and the bag becomes a lot larger to accommodate everything. -Pockets on the belt for snacks (great little pockets for gum, peanuts etc. that you don’t need to stop for). -The space for the bladder. -The molded back for air flow, which still comfortable. -The camera area is almost a bag within the bag because you can use a draw string to pull the padding tight to what you have within it. I too would highly recommend this bag for the outdoor/sport minded photographer. September 16, 2013
Rated 4 out of 5 by Not for pro gear Good amateur or enthousiat bag, but not meant for pro gear. It will take my Canon 7D with 24-105L lens attached, but I can't fit my 70-200 2.8 IS. But I must say that it's comfortable and intelligently thought out. September 15, 2013
Rated 3 out of 5 by This is a bag with a specific purpose and it works. I don't think most photographers can get by with a single bag these days. Different situations require different kit and that can require a different bag. Shooting sport probably requires a long fast lens. Landscape mostly wide to midrange although I love using a long lens in the mountains. For 'Active' photographers there is a trade off between mobility the photo kit you can carry. This bag tries to cater for that compromise. It lets you carry a camera and spare item in the padded area and general items in the rest of the pack. When I bought this my kit was a Nikon D800 with a Nikon 16-35 F4, a Nikon 70-200 F4 and a 50mm F1.4. I also packed a flash. The bag took my camera and both lenses with comfort, though I could only stash the camera with the wide lens mounted as the #quite compact# tele was too long on the bag. The f1.4 and flash had to go in the main bag. The main bag was quite an odd shape, though not a bad size for a day bag. Small items tend to slip down between the camera pod and the outer bag. OK if you are stuffing your Goretex or a fleece into it, not so good for a flash. So we can see the limitations here. For a day trip, the two lenses would be fine. I was on a three week trip and wanted to cover the options, so I was asking a bit too much of the bag, my fault. Like I say, it's hard to get by with a single bag. For a day trip with the 16-35/70-200, some maps, food and a waterproof I think this bag is fine. Away from the camera stuff for a bit, I was unconvinced when I saw the thin padding on the shoulder straps, but with heavy kit and extras it was really comfortable. After an all day carry it was fine, and I'm 60! Summary: You have to know what you want a bag to do, then pick a bag to fit. The Lowepro range is very diverse because of the range of activities a photographer might choose. This bag is very good to take a compact pro kit on a day trip into the hills, No tent, no sleeping bag, no stove but lots of photos! November 6, 2013
Rated 5 out of 5 by Hiking bag that keeps my kit safe. This bag came with me to The Black Hills, Yellowstone, Glacier and Yosemite national parks in the USA. It carried my canon 60D, sigma 24-70 2.8 and canon 50 1.8 along my macbook pro 13" that I slid into the back section and on some days the top compartment would carry memory cards (in a peli case), food, water, hard drive, rain or down jacket and hammock to name a few. Most of my days were spent walking or scrambling trails ranging from 3 to 15 miles and this bag took everything I gave it on the chin. I have a bad lower back and this bag didn't aggravate it but could do with thicker waist straps. I would recommend this bag to any hikers, bikers, climbers etc who need a practical bag that carried their camera and other essentials. September 21, 2013
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Question & Answer
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Will a laptop fit?

I looks like you could slide a laptop into that top zipper, but I can't tell for sure from the pictures and it doesn't say anything about being able to do that in the description. Is it possible? And if so, will a 15" macbook pro fit?
6 months ago
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Italy
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Answer: 
Unfortunately a laptop doesn't fit in this bag.

You can use our Bagfinder tool to specify your specific hardware and see all our recommended fits:

http://www.lowepro.com/bagfinder
6 months ago
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Petaluma, CA
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Answer: 
My Macbook pro 13" fits in the back pocket where the water bladder goes. It's a tight squeeze, but it does fit and zip easily.
1 month ago
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Should/Waist Strap Padding

How much padding is there in the shoulder straps and waist belt? What kind of padding is it?

Do the adjustment straps for the should straps need to get loosened each time to install/remove a bladder?

Thanks.
6 months ago
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Reno, NV, USA
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The shoulder straps on this bag use a combination of both open and closed cell foams. The body facing material on the shoulder strap contains a stretch material for additional comfort.

You do have to slide the tension straps out of the way to fit the hydration bladder into the bag.
6 months ago
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Petaluma, CA
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Is the camera chamber removable in the 200 AW?

I can see in the larger 30L, the camera chamber is removable so the pack can also be used a normal backpack. Is it removable in the 200AW as well?

Thanks in advance.
6 months ago
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Idaho, USA
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Answer: 
You are correct, the camera compartment is removable in the Photo Sport 30L, however, the camera compartment in the Photo Sport 200 AW is not removable.
6 months ago
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Petaluma, CA
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Is there a place for tripod?

I didn't see it listed in the product details...
6 months ago
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There is not a dedicated Tripod holder on the Photo Sport 200 AW. You could store a small Joby tripod in the side mesh pocket.
6 months ago
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Petaluma, CA
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I have read that your are integrating earth-conscious materials into your designs such as recycled Cyclepet™. But in the details of this product it doesn't say which materials or fabrics being used. I would therefore like to know if any perfluorochemical, PFC, PTFE has been used and how much earth-conscious materials this product is made of. It would of course be great if you add that information to all your products so you could make a more Eco friendly decision when buying your great bags.
BR
Johan
4 months, 1 week ago
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Sweden
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Answer: 
The bags you were reading about with the 100% post consumer recyclable material was our Terraclime Series:

http://www.lowepro.com/terraclimese...

The majority material used on the PhotoSport 200AW is a nylon with at UTS coating.
4 months, 1 week ago
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Petaluma, CA
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Dimensions & Specifications

Fits:

  • Up to a pro-sized DSLR with a kit lens attached
  • Flash
  • Hydration reservoir (up to 70 oz. or 2 liters; not included)
  • Personal items

Technical Specifications:

Internal Dimensions: 19.5 x 9 x 23 cm (7.68 x 3.54 x 9.06 in)

External Dimensions: 27 x 17 x 49 cm (10.63 x 6.69 x 19.29 in)

Top Compartment: 22.5 x 10.5 x 20.5 cm (8.86 x 4.13 x 8.07 in)

Weight: 1.3 kg (2.86 lbs)

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